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You Don’t Need a Home to Vote Social Media Guide

Written by admin on . Posted in

Infographics:
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2018 Voting Infographic
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 Poster:

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Sample Tweets:

Sample Facebook Posts:

  • Can homeless people vote? Yes! Here are some fast facts on states and voting. View the larger maps to get an idea of your home state’s laws. http://bit.ly/2p3HGck http://bit.ly/2x7iB4G Read more at: http://bit.ly/HomelessVoting #YouDontNeedAHomeToVote
  • Wondering how your organization can assist clients in the voting process? Here are six ways you can make it easier for people to inform themselves and vote on Election Day. http://bit.ly/2OgPxOv Read the “Homeless and Low-Income Voter Rights Manual” compiled by the National Coalition for the Homeless at http://bit.ly/HomelessVoting for more information. #YouDontNeedAHomeToVote
  • There are many organizations dedicated to informing the electorate on why they should vote and how they can vote. Here are six websites that will provide homeless and low-income voters with more information. http://bit.ly/2Oe2DfA Read more at: http://bit.ly/HomelessVoting #YouDontNeedAHomeToVote
  • Feeling doubtful that your low-income clients are interested in voting? Read why it is essential to put your attitude aside and help out with voter registration. http://bit.ly/2MseANb Read more at: http://bit.ly/HomelessVoting #YouDontNeedAHomeToVote
  • Many low-income and homeless voters may be hesitant to register to vote, due to preconceived barriers. Here are four steps for encouraging a reluctant voter. http://bit.ly/2p4hbDG For more details, visit http://bit.ly/HomelessVoting #YouDontNeedAHomeToVote

#TBT – Street Newspapers

Written by admin on . Posted in Uncategorized

If you live in, or have ever been to, a city like Chicago, or Washington, DC, San Francisco, Nashville or Seattle, you have probably seen a vendor selling a paper that reports on issues of poverty and homelessness. This is a “Street Newspaper,” and there are over 40 of these in print in North America, and over 100 published in 34 countries around the world.

photo credit Do Haeng Michael Kitchen

We’ve shared before about the activism of the 1980’s and 90’s, when our current era of homelessness was just starting to rear its ugly head. People who were becoming homeless were intimately involved in advocacy and services to help folks who were unhoused. By the late 1980’s, homeless advocates realized there was a need for educating the larger public about the issues surrounding homelessness. Street News, first published in NYC in 1989, is credited with being the first street newspaper focused on homeless issues, followed closely by Street Sheet, still published by the Coalition on Homelessness in San Francisco.

Inspired by Street News, the Big Issue was launched as a “social business” in 1991 in the UK, inspiring a further wave of street newspapers across Europe. The International Network of Street Papers (INSP) was created in 1994 and our own beloved Michael Stoops helped to start the North American Street Newspaper Association (NASNA) in 1996. The two networks worked collaboratively until 2013, when INSP became the single global network for street papers on all six continents.

Recent numbers from the INSP Network

Street papers in the US have, for the most part, intended to act as both an advocacy tool and a primary way for people who have been homeless to be active leaders in that advocacy. Today, most papers are run, written, and sold by homeless folks. Many papers offer case management assistance, training and networking opportunities to homeless folks in their communities.

The National Coalition for the Homeless has long supported the advocacy and empowerment outlet that street newspapers have provided. Street papers across the world continue to break down barriers between housed and unhoused people, creating employment opportunities to poor people worldwide.

Read More:

California Considers Homeless Voter Registration Act

Written by Annie Leomporra on . Posted in Uncategorized

As we inch closer toward the general election this November, it’s urgent that we focus on making it as easy as possible for the voices of people experiencing homelessness to be acknowledged through their vote. While the National Coalition for the Homeless has made great strides over the last two and a half decades in helping to secure the rights of individuals without secure housing to register and vote, there are still plenty of areas for improvement.

California State Senator Carol Liu

In February of this year California State Senator Carol Liu introduced SB 928, the Homeless Voter Registration Act, for consideration. Over the past two decades states as diverse as Illinois, Arizona, and West Virginia have adopted similar acts, which are based upon NCH’s own model legislation. The Homeless Voter Registration Act would amend California’s elections and motor vehicles codes in order to allow people experiencing homelessness to use their shelter address, post office, or the cross streets closest to where they reside when applying for a state ID.

This kind of change is more important than ever with new voter identification requirements popping up across the country, though the inability to get a government-issued photo ID can be a barrier to even registering to vote. However, it’s by no means the only barrier that people experiencing homelessness can face when trying to exercise their constitutional right  to vote. Many people lack the documentation necessary to apply for photo ID’s, and retrieving it can be a difficult and relatively expensive process. Depending on the locations of polling places, the lack of transportation can also pose a serious problem.

Fortunately, there are plenty of ways that you can help. Contact your local service providers and churches to see which ones provide assistance in obtaining legal documents, and connect your homeless neighbors to those services. Start your own voter registration drive using materials available on our website’s “You Don’t Need a Home to Vote” campaign page. When voting starts, coordinate with shelters and other providers to help transport registered voters to their polling locations. Together we can make sure that everyone who wants to vote in 2016 has the opportunity to do so.

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