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Search Results for ‘cities with food sharing ordinances’

New Report: The Criminalization of Food-Sharing Practices

Written by NCH Staff on . Posted in Advocacy, Awareness, Civil Rights, Community Organizing, Food Sharing

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On Tuesday, October 21, Fort Lauderdale Commissioners will vote on a proposed ordinance that will severely limit the capabilities of groups to distribute food to people experiencing homelessness. According to our research, over 30 American cities that have tried to introduce similar legislation in the past two years.

The new report, Share No More: The Criminalization of Efforts to Feed People In Needdocuments the recent known cases of food-sharing restrictions throughout the country. Since January 2013, 21 cities have restricted the practice of sharing food with people who are experiencing homelessness while at least ten others have introduced ordinances that are pending approval.

These restrictions primarily come about in three different forms; the first is by restricting the use of public property. In this scenario, individuals and organizations are generally required to obtain a permit, often for a fee, to share food in a park or in another public space. 12 cities have recently passed legislation that imposes this type of restriction.

The second type of legislative restriction is to require groups to comply with city/county/state food-safety regulations. Since January 2013, four cities have passed legislation that required individuals and organizations to comply with their food-safety regulations when sharing food with people experiencing homelessness.

The last method utilized to deter food-sharing are community actions driven by the principle of “Not In My Back Yard (NIMBY)”. Often, local businesses and homeowners do not want to attract people experiencing homelessness to their community join together to put pressure on local government or directly on individuals and organizations that share food with people experiencing homelessness. These groups are harassed and in result feel compelled to relocate their food-sharing efforts or cut the program all together. Since January 2013, four cities have successfully utilized this tactic, with local community pressure, to pass legislation to restrict sharing food with people experiencing homelessness.

Share No MoreThis year’s food-sharing report attempts to address the myths and motivations that often drive the demand for food-sharing restrictions. While the evidence is overwhelming that this practice is too common, there are some success stories that prove that these restrictions do not need to stand. Citizens can use the same community pressure to stop these laws from taking effect. Some faith-based organizations have led the fight to protect their First Amendment Right to openly practice their religion. There are a number of policies we can advocate for on the local, state, and federal level to protect the civil rights of those experiencing homelessness.

Since January, 2013 the following 22 cities have passed ordinances that restrict the food-sharing process.

Public Property:

Food Safety:

Forced Relocation:

  • Fort Lauderdale, FL
  • Lake Worth, FL
  • Daytona Beach, FL
  • Houston, TX
  • Shawnee, OK
  • Costa Mesa, CA
  • Chico, CA
  • Hayward, CA
  • Manchester, NH
  • Olympia, WA
  • Columbia, SC
  • Medford, OR
  • Raleigh, NC
  • Salt Lake City, UT
  • Myrtle Beach, SC
  • St. Louis, Missouri
  • Pasadena, CA
  • Lafayette, IN
  • Harrisburg, PA
  • Seattle WA
  • Charlotte, NC
  • St. Petersburg, FL

 For more information about food-sharing restrictions please read this year’s report and/or contact the National Coalition for the Homeless.

National Day of Action for Housing

Written by admin on . Posted in

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The National Coalition for the Homeless held a NATIONAL DAY OF ACTION FOR HOUSING in Washington, DC, and in communities across the country, on Saturday, April 1, 2017.

Nearly 1,000 advocates in 25 cities nationwide took part to protest cuts to affordable housing, racial inequality in our cities, and the criminalization of poverty. These remain our demands:

  1. Preserve funding and create further local, state and national housing resources solely for extremely low to moderate income, elderly and disabled households.
  2. Stop ordinances, policies and practices that 1) criminalize and harrass people who are unhoused, 2) promote racial discrimination, or 3) prevent equal treatment of immigrants, people with disabilities, or those who identify as LGBTQ, especially in access to housing, employment and healthcare.
  3. Ensure that safety net programs like food assistance, health care and emergency housing are available to any Americans residents in need of support.

Locations of Sister City Actions:
16 states
and the District of Columbia
25 cities and the District of Columbia

State City Organization
CA Los Angeles U.S. Vets Homeless Feeding & Housing Services
Santa Monica The Children’s Lifesavings Foundation
Sacramento Sacramento Homeless Organizing Committee
CO Boulder Boulder Rights Watch
Colorado Springs The Coalition for Compassion and Action
Denver Colorado Coalition for the Homeless
DC Washington National Coalition for the Homeless
FL Gainesville GRACE Marketplace
Ft. Lauderdale Alliance to End Homelessness, FL Homeless Bill of Rights Campaign
St. Petersburg Poor People’s Economic Right Campaign, My Place and Recovery, Florida’s Homeless Action Coalition
Tallahassee Florida Homeless Action Coalition
GA Atlanta Housing Justice League
ID Boise Boise/Ada Co Homeless Coalition, Idaho Tiny House Assoc.
IL Chicago Chicago Area Fair Housing Alliance
MD Clear Spring Laced with Grace Homeless Ministry
MA Salem March for the Homeless Massachusetts District
MN Minneapolis Metropolitan Interfaith Council on Affordable Housing
MS Meridian Multi County Community Service Agency Inc.
Tupelo All Saints Episcopal, Family Resource Center
MO Kansas City Episcopal Community Services
NJ Perth Amboy
NC Asheville BeLoved Asheville
OH Cincinnati Cincinnati Coalition for the Homeless
TN Memphis H.O.P.E. Homeless Organizing for Power and Equality
Nashville Open Table Nashville
TX Austin House the Homeless, Inc.

Other resources and follow-up:

No Safe Street: A Survey of Violence Committed against Homeless People

Written by admin on . Posted in

Over the last several months, San Diego has been sweeping homeless encampments, constantly displacing residents who have nowhere else to go and disposing of items of personal and survival value. Quietly, the city laid down boulders beneath an overpass, on a side walk often used by houseless folks to rest. Later that year, three teenagers were charged in 2016 with beating a homeless man to death just outside of the city. Just one month after, another series of senseless attacks on men sleeping outdoors in San Diego left three dead and one more critically injured.

The National Coalition for the Homeless is deeply saddened by these events, but we are not surprised.

In the early 1990’s, the National Coalition for the Homeless noticed that a growing number of cities were passing ordinances banning everyday activities carried out by people who were homeless. Bans on panhandling, camping, or even sharing food in public places have since become common place in cities across the country, just as poverty and homelessness have been increasing.

No Safe Street: A Survey of Violence Committed against Homeless People a new report published by the National Coalition for the Homeless finds that over the last 17 years, at least 1,657 people experiencing homelessness have been the victims of violence perpetrated for the sole reason that they were unhoused at the time. This number includes 428 men and women who lost their lives for being homeless, and in the wrong place at the wrong time.

It is easy to see a correlation between the appearance of laws criminalizing homelessness, and the increase of hate crimes or violent acts against homeless people. A 2014 report from the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty entitled No Safe Street found that out of 187 cities that have enacted some type of law criminalizing daily activities often carried out by people without stable housing, 21 cities were located in California (11%) and 17 were in Florida (9%). No Safe Street reports that out of 199 attacks against homeless persons in 2014-2015, the largest share of incidents took place in California (43 attacks) and Florida (18 attacks).

One possible explanation for this is the message that criminalizing homelessness sends to the general public: “Homeless people do not matter and are not worthy of living in our city.” This message is blatant in the attitudes many cities have toward homeless people and can be used as an internal justification for attacking someone.

No Safe Street cites more than double the number of fatalities from bias motivated violence against people who are homeless than the FBI has tracked for all federally protected classes combined. Professor of Criminal Justice at California State University San Bernardino, Brian Levin, finds that “the characteristics of bias attacks against the homeless are very similar to that of hate crime in general. As with other hate crimes, offenders fit a pattern: typically, young male “thrill offenders” acting on stereotypes, seeking excitement and peer validation.”

Moreover, in communities across the country (except for a handful of progressive cities and states), it is perfectly legal to discriminate against someone who is unhoused in employment, housing, or even in delivery of health or social services. What message are our municipalities sending to their residents?

As we have attempted to legislate homelessness out of sight in our communities, we have created a hostile environment for people who fall on hard times. Social services have not kept up with the pace of need, and in many cases have been cut or restricted. Instead of responding with compassion and generosity, on the whole, our communities have responded with prejudice and judgement.

Study after study has found savings for public services when someone is housed versus homeless. In fact, in 2016 the University of Denver’s School of Law released a report which found that just six Colorado cities have spent more than five million dollars enforcing 14 anti-homeless ordinances over the last 5 years through policing, court and incarceration costs.  Our failure to end homelessness has only brought financial and human costs to our communities.

As we look towards a change in our federal leadership, the National Coalition for the Homeless calls on our fellow citizens to prioritize compassion over comfort. The solution to homelessness, and the best method for preventing further violence, is simple: housing.

 

Read the full report.

View more about Hate Crimes against people experiencing homeless.

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